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Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Centralia Massacre by Jesse James, Bloody Bill Anderson and his Guerrillas Happened Today in 1864, 123 Union Troops Killed - AUDIO STORY

Jesse James, William T. "Bloody Bill" Anderson
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Centralia Massacre

by Bob Priddy on September 27, 2011

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They were waiting when the train arrived.  They knew the train would stop.  It had to.  They had placed railroad ties on the rails.  About 150 people were aboard the train coming in to Centralia that day, including a dozen soldiers.  Those soldiers would become target practice for “Bloody Bill” Anderson and his guerrillas. One of the worst incidents of Missouri’s Civil War will take place in Centralia today.
AUDIO:CLICK HERE Listen to program

 Dave Poole: Missouri Guerrilla 

By: Tim Kent's Civil War tales - Just different blogs from a lifelong Civil War historian.

Captain Dave Poole

       Dave Poole began the Civil War as a lieutenant under William Clarke Quantrill. He was in command of his own gang of 'bushwhackers' later in the war. He managed to maintain a fairly low profile during the first couple of years, but as things got bloodier, so did Dave. By 1864, Dave Poole was among the bloodiest. 
       At one point, his gang came upon nine Federal soldiers hiding in a schoolhouse. After killing all nine, Dave had the corpses propped in chairs at the desks. He then proceeded to teach the dead Federals for an hour using the blackboard to give demonstrations. Upon finishing the lesson, he announced that his pupils were very loyal to sit and listen the way they had. 
       He was wounded at least once during the war while serving under Quantrill near Pleasant Hill. 


William Clarke Quantrill

       On September 27, 1864, Dave Poole played a key role in the ambush of Major Ave Johnston's Federal troops. Johnston had chased Poole's men into a field with a tree-line on three sides. Johnston immediately dismounted his 155 cavalrymen to face Poole's troops who had wheeled around near the trees. 
       Upon seeing the Federals dismount, one of the bushwhackers remarked, "They are dismounting to fight! My God, the Lord have mercy on them!"
        

Major A.V.E. Johnston

       Major Johnston had been warned by the townspeople that Bloody Bill Anderson was on the scene in command of a large guerrilla force, but he discounted the reports. He believed he only faced about 80 men. His men were at a huge disadvantage because they carried muskets and couldn't fight on horseback. After firing, his men would be forced to reload which would take almost half a minute. The Confederate guerrilla's carried a pistol in each hand with six shots each and had learned to ride with their horses reins in their teeth. 


Bloody Bill Anderson (photographed in death)

       It appeared Johnston had the enemy where he wanted him. At that moment, Confederate guerrilla's on horseback emerged from the trees from in front and on both sides of him. There were gangs present under not only Bloody Bill Anderson, but also George Todd, Dave Poole, Si Gordon, John Thrailkill, and Tom Todd. Johnston had driven his men into a trap and they didn't stand a chance. 


The trap laid by Bloody Bill Anderson

        The result was what is called today 'the Centralia Massacre.' Despite Federal prisoners begging for their lives, blood thirsty guerrilla's shot them down. Major Johnston would be killed by a shot from a young guerrilla named Jesse James. After the battle, Dave Poole was seen hopping from body to body because they all lay in a single line. Blood would fly into the air from the wounds as he landed on each corpse. Tom Todd, a Baptist preacher protested Poole's actions. Dave's reply was in the form of a question, "How else am I supposed to count how many we killed?"
       
  
Jesse James

When guerrilla leader George Todd was killed, Dave Poole took over his gang as well as his own. On May 21, 1865, he led forty of his men into Lexington, Missouri and surrendered. His career as a bushwhacker was over.
       His career as an outlaw had just began, but it wouldn't last long. On October 30, 1866, Dave Poole, his brother and three other men robbed a bank in Lexington. They made off with two thousand dollars in cash which equals about $45,000 dollars today. They missed a large sum of money in the vault because they failed to find the key. 
       The governor of Missouri ordered all men of military age to join the militia in an attempt to stop crime. Anyone failing to comply would be subject to arrest. Dave Poole and twenty-five of his former gang rode into Lexington to volunteer. This was done as a joke because everyone knew that Poole had been behind the holdup. They were turned down for service and ordered to leave town at once. One of his men, Little Archie Clement refused to leave and entered a bar where he proceeded to get drunk. The military went there to arrest him, but he refused to surrender and was killed.
       

Dave Poole (standing) and Archie Clement (left)

       Dave Poole would soon leave Missouri and move to Texas where he ran a ranch. He eventually moved to New Mexico and then on to Arizona where he died. He was one of the few guerrilla leaders that would survive the war. 




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DEA Heroin Busts in Franklin County, Eight Arrested, Search Continues for 103 people in St. Louis region

_________________________________________________________________________

Drug Agents Arrest Heroin Suspects in Regional Roundup

By Ed Pruneau, Missourian Managing Editor
September 27, 2011
__________________________________________________________________________


Narcotics investigators are hoping that a large-scale regional roundup of criminal suspects Tuesday will help put a dent in heroin trafficking in the Franklin County area.
Officers with the Franklin County Narcotics Enforcement Unit, city police officers and agents with the federal Drug Enforcement Administration had arrested eight people by Tuesday morning on Franklin County charges as part of a larger initiative being staged throughout the St. Louis region.
They were continuing to look for seven more suspects who are named in indictments, said Detective Cpl. Scott Briggs with the county task force.
Throughout the St. Louis region, law enforcement agencies were searching for 103 people who face various charges ranging from simple possession to distribution of heroin, according to a DEA agent working with the county drug task force.
"We're hoping this may have an effect on the heroin trafficking out here," Briggs said. "We continue to find heroin and hear about it being sold in this area."
Most of the heroin showing up in Franklin County comes from St. Louis.
Tuesday's regional operation extends as far north as Lincoln County and east into Illinois. At least one suspect was being sought in the Columbia area in Boone County, Briggs said.
Briggs said in Franklin County the operation began Monday afternoon with the arrest of a man and woman during a traffic stop and started up again at 6 a.m. Tuesday when officers armed with grand jury indictments signed by Circuit Judge Gael Wood began picking up suspects.
Monday afternoon's stop resulted in the arrest of 26-year-old Jesse C. Brewer of Beaufort and Brandi McAfee, 26, Marthasville, Briggs said. Both are on probation in prior felony cases, he noted. Investigators plan to seek charges of felony possession of drug paraphernalia against Brewer and possession and distribution of heroin against McAfee, Briggs said.

Indicted
Following are the suspects named in Franklin County indictments:
• Zachary Q. Breeden, 21, Union, two counts of possession of heroin, one count of possession of drug paraphernalia and one count of littering, $20,000 bond.
• Jefrey E. Brown, 31, St. Clair, one count of possession of heroin, $10,000 bond.
• Michael H. Smith, 28, Washington, one count of distribution of heroin and one count of possession of drug paraphernalia, $15,000 bond.
• Nicholas J. Kunderer, 30, Washington, one count of possession of heroin, $20,000 bond.
• Tony S. Ward, 25, Arnold, distribution of heroin, $25,000 bond.
• Raymond A. Bell, 29, Washington, possession of heroin, $7,500 bond.

Briggs said Kunderer, Ward and Bell currently are in custody in the Missouri Department of Corrections in previous felony cases. Law enforcement authorities will seek detainers on them, he noted.
Names of the other suspects being sought in the operation here were not released because grand jury indictments, by law, are sealed until served on a defendant.
Some of the charges here date from 2009 through 2011, Briggs noted.
The coordinated regional operation involved more than 150 local and federal officers. Arrests were made in St. Louis city and St. Charles, St. Louis, Franklin, Jefferson and Lincoln counties in Missouri and in Madison and St. Clair counties in Illinois.
For at least the last two years, this area has seen a surge in the availability and purity of the drug. The more potent heroin on the street now is responsible for a growing number of overdoses and overdose deaths in the last couple of years.
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Important Note: FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog may contain copyrighted (©) material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available to advance understanding of ecological, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior general interest in receiving similar information for research and educational purposes. "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use." . ________________________________________________________________________

Missouri Mountain Lion Update: Rocky Creek Conservation Area Photo Confirmed - Shannon County

 This trail-camera photo of a mountain lion was taken on Sept. 20, 2011, at Rocky Creek Conservation Area.
 Photo "Courtesy Missouri Department of Conservation"

MDC confirms mountain lion photo taken at Rocky Creek

mdc.mo.gov
by Joe Jerek
September 27, 2011


EMINENCE, Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Mountain Lion Response Team has confirmed a trail-camera photograph of a mountain lion taken Sept. 20 at the Rocky Creek Conservation Area southwest of Eminence in Shannon County.
. MDC conservation agents confirmed the location of the photo, which shows a mountain lion moving away from the camera.
MDC Wildlife Damage Biologist Rex Martensen, who is a member of the Response Team, said that widely scattered mountain-lion sightings have been confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Recent confirmed sightings include two trail-camera photographs in Shannon County and one in Oregon County. A cougar was also recently shot by a landowner in Texas County.
Based on the lack of distinguishing physical characteristics, Martensen said that MDC does not know if the Rocky Creek, Shannon County and Oregon County photos are of the same animal.
He added that evidence to date indicates these animals are dispersing from other states to the west of Missouri. The most extreme evidence of this dispersal occurred in early 2011 when a mountain lion that was killed in Connecticut was genetically traced to South Dakota. MDC has no confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri.
“MDC receives many reports each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions,” Martensen said. “We encourage these reports, but we can only confirm those for which there is physical evidence such as hair, scat, footprints, photos, video, a dead cougar or prey showing evidence of mountain-lion attack.”
Reports of sightings can be emailed to mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov, or by contacting local conservation agents or the Response Team at 573-882-9909, ext. 3211, or 573-522-4115, ext. 3147 or 3262.
Martensen added that mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations. Although mountain lions are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code does allow people to protect themselves and their property if they feel threatened.




______________________________________________________

 

MDC confirms second photo of mountain lion in Shannon County

 by Francis Skalicky
 Sept 11, 2011


MOUNTAIN VIEW Mo – The Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Mountain Lion Response Team has confirmed a second trail-camera photograph of a mountain lion taken near Mountain View on the property of Shannon County landowner John Collins. This latest photo, taken Sept. 4, follows a confirmed trail-camera photo taken at the same location on July 29.
MDC reported earlier this week that a Texas-County landowner shot a subadult male cougar on his property on Sept. 5. MDC also recently confirmed a trail-camera photo of a mountain lion taken on private land Aug. 23 in Oregon County.
MDC Biologist Jeff Beringer, a member of the Response Team, said that the photos from Shannon County and Oregon County are not of the mountain lion shot in Texas County.
“The Texas-County cat had a shortened tail with no black tip,” Beringer explained. “The mountain lions in these photos have full-sized, normal tails.”
Based on limited photographic evidence, Beringer said MDC does not know if the Shannon County and Oregon County photos are of the same mountain lion. He added that widely scattered mountain-lion sightings have been confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Evidence to date indicates these animals are dispersing from other states to the west of Missouri. The most extreme evidence of this dispersal occurred in early 2011 when a mountain lion that was killed in Connecticut was genetically traced to South Dakota. MDC has no confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri.
MDC receives many reports each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions.
“We encourage these reports, but we can only confirm those for which there is physical evidence such as hair, scat, footprints, photos, video, a dead cougar or prey showing evidence of mountain-lion attack,” said Beringer. Reports of sightings can be sent to mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov, or by contacting Beringer at 573-882-9909, ext. 3211, Rex Martensen at 573-522-4115, ext. 3147, or Shawn Gruber at 573-522-4115, ext. 3262.
Beringer added that mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations. Although mountain lions are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code does allow people to protect themselves and their property if they feel threatened.

SEE MORE SIGHTINGS

 
 
21. September 2011 — Shannon County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera. The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the location of the image as being the same as #18 taken in July.

20. September 2011 — Texas County
Subadult male shot by a landowner. No obvious signs of confinement. DNA analysis pending.

19. August 2011 — Oregon County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera. The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the location of the image.

18. July 2011 — Shannon County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera. The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the location of the image.

17. May 2011 — Macon County
Citizen sent photos of tracks in a muddy creekbed. The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the tracks to be those of a mountain lion.

16. March 2011 — Oregon County
Citizen reported observing a mountain lion jump a fence. DNA analysis of hairs collected at the scene confirmed species; ancestry analysis is underway.

15. January 2011 — Macon County
Subadult male shot by coyote hunters. No obvious signs of confinement. DNA analysis determined this mountain lion was likely a descendant of a South Dakota population.

14. January 2011 — St. Louis County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by motion-activated game camera.

13. January 2011 — Ray County
Subadult male treed and shot by raccoon hunters. No obvious signs of confinement. DNA analysis determined this mountain lion was likely a descendant of a South Dakota population.

12. December 2010 — Linn County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by motion-activated game camera.

11. November 2010 — Platte County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by landowner. DNA analysis of hair samples collected from the scene could not confirm ancestry.

10. December 2006 — Livingston County
A photograph of a probable subadult was taken by a motion-activated game camera.

9. November 2006 — Shannon County
Tracks and deer carcass characteristic of a mountain lion kill were found.

8. August 2003 — Callaway County
An approximately 1 1/2-year-old male road kill. There were no obvious signs that it was formerly a captive animal. DNA analysis revealed its origin to be North America.

7. October 2002 — Clay County
A two- to three-year-old male road kill. DNA analysis revealed its origin to be North America.

6. December 2001 — Pulaski County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera. After a lengthy evaluation, it was determined that it was likely a small, subadult mountain lion.

5. December 2000 — Lewis County
A video was taken by a deer hunter from a tree stand.

4. January 1999 — Texas County
An adult-sized lion was treed by a rabbit hunter’s dogs. Tracks in the snow (photos taken) and two deer carcasses characteristic of lion kills were found nearby.

3. January 1997 — Christian County
A video was taken by a property owner. The animal’s behavior suggested it had once been held in captivity.

2. November 1996 — Reynolds County
A conservation agent video-recorded a mountain lion with a deer carcass. 

1. December 1994 — Carter County
A small adult female was treed and shot by two raccoon hunters near Peck Ranch Conservation Area. The carcass was never recovered, but a photo was obtained of the animal on a truck tailgate. Federal authorities fined each hunter $2,000. In Nov. 1998, a deer hunter found the skinned pelt of a small adult, a female, with head and feet attached, near a remote Texas County road. Although evidence suggests this is the same animal killed in Carter County, it cannot be confirmed absolutely.
_______________________________________

Mountain lion shot by landowner in Texas County

SUMMERSVILLE, Mo – A landowner in Texas County shot a mountain lion on Sept. 5 after encountering it on his property. The landowner then called Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) regional offices to report the incident. Shannon County Conservation Agent Justin Emery responded to the incident and conducted an investigation. Emery found no grounds for charges at this time. Although mountain lions are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code does allow people to protect themselves and their property if they feel threatened.
MDC took possession of the subadult male mountain lion, which will be used for educational purposes and DNA testing.
The incident occurred approximately three miles from where a Shannon County landowner’s trail camera captured an image of a mountain lion on July 29. In a separate sighting, an Oregon County landowner captured an image on his trail camera of a mountain lion on Aug. 23 northeast of Alton.
MDC Biologist Jeff Beringer, who is a member of MDC’s Mountain Lion Response Team, says that widely scattered mountain lion sightings have been confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Evidence to date indicates these animals are dispersing from other states to the west of Missouri. The most extreme evidence of this dispersal occurred in early 2011 when a mountain lion that was killed in Connecticut was genetically traced to South Dakota.
MDC has no confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri.
MDC receives many reports each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions.
“We encourage these reports, but we can only confirm those for which there is physical evidence such as hair, scat, footprints, photos, video, a dead cougar or prey showing evidence of mountain-lion attack,” says Beringer.
Reports of sightings can be sent to mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov, or by contacting Beringer at 573-882-9909, ext. 3211, Rex Martensen at 573-522-4115, ext. 3147, or Shawn Gruber at 573-522-4115, ext. 3262.
Beringer adds that mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations.
For more information, visit www.mdc.mo.gov and search “mountain lion.”

 


 

Mountain lion photographed in Oregon County

by Francis Skalicky 
September 1, 2011

ALTON, Mo -- A landowner’s trail camera has confirmed a mountain lion sighting in Oregon County. The camera image, which was of the back-portion of a mountain lion, was sent to Conservation Agent Brad Hadley on Aug. 29. Hadley forwarded the image on to the Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Mountain Lion Response Team. The image was taken on August 23 on private land near the Eleven Point River northeast of Alton. Conservation agents Hadley and Paul Veatch visited the site on Aug 29 and confirmed the location of the image.
MDC Biologist Jeff Beringer, who is a member of the Response Team, says that widely scattered mountain lion sightings have been confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Evidence to date indicates these animals are dispersing from other states to the west of Missouri. The most extreme evidence of this dispersal occurred earlier this year when a mountain lion that was killed in Connecticut was genetically traced to South Dakota.
MDC has no confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri.
MDC receives many reports each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions.
“We encourage these reports, but we can only confirm those for which there is physical evidence such as hair, scat, footprints, photos, video, a dead cougar or prey showing evidence of mountain-lion attack,” says Beringer.
Reports of sightings can be sent to mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov, or by contacting Beringer at 573-882-9909, ext. 3211, Rex Martensen at 573-522-4115, ext. 3147, or Shawn Gruber at 573-522-4115, ext. 3262.
Mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations. Although they are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code does allow people to protect themselves and their property if necessary.

________________________________________________________________________

Photo "Courtesy Missouri Department of Conservation"
_________________________________________________________________________

mdc.mo.gov
Aug. 12, 2011
__________________________________________________________________________


Mountian lion photographed in Shannon County Missouri

MOUNTAIN VIEW, Mo -- A landowner’s trail camera has confirmed a mountain lion sighting in Shannon County. The landowner emailed the Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Mountain Lion Response Team on Aug. 6 with a camera image of a mountain lion walking through a clearing. The image was taken on July 29 on private land at the west edge of the county near Mountain View. Shannon County Conservation Agent Brad Hadley visited the site on Aug 9. and confirmed the location of the image.
MDC Biologist Jeff Beringer says that widely scattered mountain lion sightings have been confirmed in Missouri and likely will continue. Evidence to date indicates these animals are dispersing from other states to the west of Missouri. The most extreme evidence of this dispersal occurred earlier this year when a mountain lion that was killed in Connecticut was genetically traced to South Dakota.
MDC has no confirmed evidence of a breeding population in Missouri.
MDC receives many reports each year from people who believe they have seen mountain lions.
“We encourage these reports, but we can only confirm those for which there is physical evidence such as hair, scat, footprints, photos, video, a dead cougar or prey showing evidence of mountain-lion attack,” says Beringer, who is a member of the Response Team.
Reports of sightings can be sent to mountain.lion@mdc.mo.gov, or by contacting Beringer at 573-882-9909, ext. 3211, Rex Martensen at 573-522-4115, ext. 3147, or Shawn Gruber at 573-522-4115, ext. 3262.
Mountain lions are naturally shy of humans and generally pose little danger to people, even in states with thriving breeding populations. Although they are protected by law, Missouri’s Wildlife Code does allow people to protect themselves and their property if necessary.
For more information visit www.missouriconservation.org and search “mountain lion.”

Confirmed Sightings

SEE MORE SIGHTINGS


18. July 2011 — Shannon County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera.The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the location of the image.

17. May 2011 — Macon County
Citizen sent photos of tracks in a muddy creekbed. The Department's Mountain Lion Response Team confirmed the tracks to be those of a mountain lion.

16. March 2011 — Oregon County
Citizen reported observing a mountain lion jump a fence. DNA analysis of hairs collected at the scene confirmed species; ancestry analysis is underway.

15. January 2011 — Macon County
Subadult male shot by coyote hunters. No obvious signs of confinement. DNA analysis determined this mountain lion was likely a descendant of a South Dakota population.

14. January 2011 — St. Louis County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by motion-activated game camera.

13. January 2011 — Ray County
Subadult male treed and shot by raccoon hunters. No obvious signs of confinement. DNA analysis determined this mountain lion was likely a descendant of a South Dakota population.

12. December 2010 — Linn County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by motion-activated game camera.

11. November 2010 — Platte County
Photo of probable subadult disperser taken by landowner. DNA analysis of hair samples collected from the scene could not confirm ancestry.

10. December 2006 — Livingston County
A photograph of a probable subadult was taken by a motion-activated game camera.

9. November 2006 — Shannon County
Tracks and deer carcass characteristic of a mountain lion kill were found.

8. August 2003 — Callaway County
An approximately 1 1/2-year-old male road kill. There were no obvious signs that it was formerly a captive animal. DNA analysis revealed its origin to be North America.

7. October 2002 — Clay County
A two- to three-year-old male road kill. DNA analysis revealed its origin to be North America.

6. December 2001 — Pulaski County
A photograph was taken by a motion-activated game camera. After a lengthy evaluation, it was determined that it was likely a small, subadult mountain lion.

5. December 2000 — Lewis County
A video was taken by a deer hunter from a tree stand.

4. January 1999 — Texas County
An adult-sized lion was treed by a rabbit hunter’s dogs. Tracks in the snow (photos taken) and two deer carcasses characteristic of lion kills were found nearby.

3. January 1997 — Christian County
A video was taken by a property owner. The animal’s behavior suggested it had once been held in captivity.

2. November 1996 — Reynolds County
A conservation agent video-recorded a mountain lion with a deer carcass. 

1. December 1994 — Carter County
A small adult female was treed and shot by two raccoon hunters near Peck Ranch Conservation Area. The carcass was never recovered, but a photo was obtained of the animal on a truck tailgate. Federal authorities fined each hunter $2,000. In Nov. 1998, a deer hunter found the skinned pelt of a small adult, a female, with head and feet attached, near a remote Texas County road. Although evidence suggests this is the same animal killed in Carter County, it cannot be confirmed absolutely.



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______________________________________________________ ___________________________ . . VIDEO: MISSOURI THE BEAUTIFUL Take a patriotic tour of the Show Me State's natural wonders . . ========================================================== . Important Note: FAIR USE NOTICE: This blog may contain copyrighted (©) material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Such material is made available to advance understanding of ecological, political, human rights, economic, democracy, scientific, moral, ethical, and social justice issues, etc. It is believed that this constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C. Section 107, this material is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior general interest in receiving similar information for research and educational purposes. "Copyright Disclaimer Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use." . ________________________________________________________________________

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